What’s In Store

20 09 2012

Old Retailing professors never die.

Before I walked to the dark side of administration and was relieved of much of my teaching duties, I used to teach a course in Retail Management. It was so much fun to keep up with the trends and changes, things like co-branding, kiosks, the c-store revolution, big boxes. And E-commerce.

Yeah, that one was a real revolution, for it was the biggest paradigm shift since we went from Sears catalogs to national chains. It’s also how I created a what was once a course in E-commerce, which then evolved into…well, Evolutionary Marketing.

Yep, I am already plugging my Summer 2013 course. Don’t miss it.

But E-commerce was only the beginning of the revolution. Yes, it awoke many a sleeping giant retailer, and whipped them into submission. Thank you very much, Amazon.

Shopping and retailing continue to change, and the future is going to require sunglasses. It is going to require that retailers be resilient and open to an increasing ate of change. And here’s the sobering takeaway (from the President of Nordstrom, no less): retail stores are going to be less and less about off-the-rack selling, and more and more about being a showroom. Oh yeah…with no cash-wrap stations, because it will all be done with mobile devices.

This is already being done at Apple stores. Ever try to find a cash register there? Good luck. Employees are equipped with mobile devices (aka, iPhones) with card swipers. Better yet, though, in the last year Apple introduced its own app that allows customers to check themselves out. I have used it several times…I use the app to scan any item off the shelf (it cannot be used to buy computers), and since the app is synced to my iTunes account, after a couple of taps I am done. Before I can even walk out the door I have a receipt in my .mac email account. Cha-ching. Shopping has never been better.

True dat.

The trend of scaled-back retailing is already beginning. Best Buy started shrinking its stores over a year ago, since music and movies are no longer purchased the way they were years ago. Oh, and never mind that Amazon is totally kicking their butt on anything that can be shipped in a small box.

The historic irony is that retailing may go full circle and become nothing more than a tangible catalog…the Sears of 1915, blended with the Service Merchandise model of the 1970s. Cash-and-carry may actually become harder in the future, or at least very different from that which we have grown accustomed in the recent past.

All of which means that for those of us who teach Retailing or anything related will have no shortage of work in academia. Someone’s got to stay on top of this stuff, and the faster it changes, the more work that is required. In a strange kind of way, it means that this old Retailing prof will never die. There’s too much living going on.

Dr “I’ll See You Next Summer?” Gerlich

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