As Seen On TV

10 09 2012

Back in the 1960s we thought we had it made. As in died and gone to heaven. Television. In the living room.

Never mind that for most of us, it was black-and-white. With a little imagination, we could superimpose a little color on all that grayscale.

If anything, family television viewing back then was just the same as listening to the radio…but with a screen. Everyone gathered close. Everyone, dammit. No splinter groups. This was a family activity. Sit down, shut up, and pretend like you’re enjoying yourself.

I have to laugh (maybe “cry” is a better response) when I think of my own family when it comes to TV. We have no fewer than seven TVs in the house. Just try to get all of us together to watch something. Between multiple screens and DVRs, no one ever watches anything with anyone…or when it originally aired.

Then add in Big Sis and her 2nd and 3rd screens (aka, iPhone and iPad), and you have the 21C viewing family. Yep, we put the fun in dysfunctional.

I was reminded of all this the last couple of days when a few colleagues and I started the process of responding to an RFP (that’s Request For Proposals) to a major media company seeking to award a major research grant to qualified applicants. The RFP mentions media, technology, family, and all that stuff that just complicates things. Why? Because whoever can put the puzzle together first is bound to make a big pile of money selling ads through it.

I feel like we are on the verge of yet another media revolution (as if we haven’t already gone through the fire already). Internet TV will finally stick (after repeated failures by Google). We will engage with this TV via our mobile devices (the 2nd and 3rd screens). We will shop while we watch (pointing our smartphones at the screen to scan that dress that Penny is wearing on BBT, or the way-cool t-shirt Sheldon has donned). Tap-tap-tap. Two days later, it lands on our doorstep.

But it will all likely be time-shifted. Mom in the bedroom. Dad in the den. Kids in bedrooms or the living room. All cross-posting to Facebook and Twitter, Klout scores growing by the minute with every person who Likes your discriminating choice in televised drama. Or the fact that you Liked Sheldon’t latest shirt.

It’s all a far cry from what my family did back in the 60s, and some would say it reflects the demise of the American family. Perhaps there’s a glimmer of truth there, but I also know that some of my more memorable intra-family exchanges of late have occurred while two or more of us were sitting under the same roof, “talking” to each other on FB and Instagram.

I know. Why don’t we just turn around and speak to each other? I dunno. But maybe, just maybe, our electronic communication was complimentary, not a substitute. The fact that I found my 14 y/o on Instagram was a fun encounter, for I had no idea. And my wife and I have had some really fun exchanges while sitting a foot apart…albeit back-to-back.

I suppose that’s the new living color. Why live in shades of gray?

Dr “Now Watching Breaking Amish–on DVR” Gerlich

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